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Glossary

The glossary below will help clarify what specific terms used to configure and use Annotate PRO mean. If you’re having difficult with something, please don’t hesitate to contact us! 

Active/Inactive

In the Annotate PRO web editor comments can be active (visible) or inactive (hidden). Annotate PRO doesn’t support deleting comments, but you can set a comment to inactive so you no longer see it when you search or when navigating your libraries. You can also hide inactive comments from the web editor with the handy toggle switch above the comments area. 

Annotate PRO+

Formerly known as “Annotate PRO Premium”, AP+ is the paid version of Annotate PRO. While individual teachers can use Annotate PRO for free, additional functionalities and benefits come from a low-cost annual subscription. Pricing information and benefits can be found here. 

Chrome Extension

The Chrome extension is the little green circle with an A in it in your Chrome (or Microsoft Edge) browser. The extension is what allows you to access your library of comments that is stored in the cloud. It’s also responsible for giving you toolbars and the right-click menu.

This is not to be confused with the web editor. The web editor, where you edit and create comments, is separate from the extension. 

Extensible

Shared libraries can be read-only or editable (extensible). Setting a shared library as “extensible” lets users who receive the shared library “extend” the library by adding to or editing their copy of the library. Any changes they make will only affect their copy of the library, not the original library or the library of any other person who receives it. 

Favorite

Comments can be toggled to “favorite” for rapid access. When a comment is set to favorite it shows up in the toolbar and right-click menu. 

Formal Sharing

(Only for institutions) Setting a library to Shared – Formal means that all users will receive the library by default. They can set the library to inactive, but it will be on their list of available libraries without them needing to manually install it.

Group

“Groups” are the secondary level of organization. Annotate PRO organizes content (from broadest to most specific) as Library > Group > Sub-Group (optional) > Comment.

Libraries are generally used for broad topics like discussion moderation or presentation skills. Groups are used to aggregate comments by topic. For example, the College Edition library has groups for grammar, formatting, and argument.

Informal Sharing

(Only for institutions) Setting a library to Shared – Informal means that all users can install the library but will not receive it by default. In order to access it they will need to open the extension and select Edit > Activate Libraries. From there they can activate the libraries from the “Libraries shared with you” list. 

Library

“Libraries” are the highest level of organization. Annotate PRO organizes content (from broadest to most specific) as Library > Group > Sub-Group (optional) > Comment.

Libraries typically cover a wide range such as a general topic (writing skills) or course (Anthropology 201). 11trees also has several libraries, authored by experts in the field, available to license. They’re great time savers and handy tools!

Your Title Goes Here

“Sub–Groups” are a third and optional level of organization. Annotate PRO organizes content (from broadest to most specific) as Library > Group > Sub-Group (optional) > Comment.

Libraries are generally used for broad topics like discussion moderation or presentation skills. Groups are used to aggregate comments by topic. For example, the College Edition library has groups for grammar, formatting, and argument. Sub-groups can be used for more granular organization or setting apart a specific topic. For example, the College Edition Library’s group called “Argument” has a Sub-Group dedicated to comments about common fallacies. 

Toolbar

Toolbar’s are one way of accessing Annotate PRO. They can be configured to be visible in different locations (and size) from the extensions menu. 

Web App

Annotate PRO’s Web App (aka Web Editor) is the “brain”  of Annotate PRO. The extension is on your local device, but it saves the comments to your secure cloud library which allows you to access your content from multiple devices. You can even access your Annotate PRO library from a device you don’t have the extension installed. The web app is also where you can access the Feedback Builder tool, manage your libraries, import content, and more.